if only i had thorns like a thistle.
Reblogged from blossite  308,397 notes

If someone cheats on you they do not love you, remember that. If someone cheats on you they do not care about you as much as they say they do. If someone cheats on you it means that for a split second you were off their mind long enough for them to put another person in arms that should only be for you. If someone cheats on you, dear god, I hope you don’t go back to them because you are worth so much more than that.

Reblogged from blossite  196,773 notes

ridge:

me as a parent 

Reblogged from ucsdhealthsciences  75 notes
ucsdhealthsciences:

Suicide risk reduction in medical students
Medical school is grueling so is it any wonder that medical students have high rates of burnout, depression and, tragically, suicide?
Help is on the way.
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine have successfully pilot-tested a two-pronged program, called HEAR, short for Healer Education Assessment and Referral, to educate medical professionals about mental illness and to screen and help medical students at risk of suicide.
The preliminary results,reported in the October issue of Academic Psychiatry, are promising.
The implementation of the HEAR program at one medical school reduced the self-reported percentage of medical students with suicidal tendencies from 8.8 percent to 6.2 percent from 2009 to 2013, almost a 30 percent decrease over the four-year period.
The UC San Diego team also observed an increase in the percentage of at-risk students in counseling, from 11.5 percent to 15 percent during the same period, a more than 30 percent increase. This is a good sign because it means people are seeking help.
The HEAR program involves both educational lectures to de-stigmatize mental illness within the broader medical community and voluntary anonymous participation in an interactive online screening survey, developed by American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Those screened as having depression or at-risk of suicide are referred to counseling or other treatment options.
“Our goals are to educate, de-stigmatize, identify, refer and treat medical students with depression and at risk of suicide,” said Nancy Downs, MD, a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and lead author. “The next step is to follow medical students through time to document whether early intervention has lasting-long term benefits.”
More than a dozen medical schools across the nation are currently testing the HEAR program.
The statistics speak to the need: Medical students are 15 to 30 percent more likely to suffer depression than others in their age group and rates of suicide are 200 percent greater among female doctors and 40 percent greater among male doctors than other professionals.
Pictured: Image courtesy of Maryam Soltani, a first-year resident at UC San Diego in family psychiatry.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Suicide risk reduction in medical students

Medical school is grueling so is it any wonder that medical students have high rates of burnout, depression and, tragically, suicide?

Help is on the way.

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine have successfully pilot-tested a two-pronged program, called HEAR, short for Healer Education Assessment and Referral, to educate medical professionals about mental illness and to screen and help medical students at risk of suicide.

The preliminary results,reported in the October issue of Academic Psychiatry, are promising.

The implementation of the HEAR program at one medical school reduced the self-reported percentage of medical students with suicidal tendencies from 8.8 percent to 6.2 percent from 2009 to 2013, almost a 30 percent decrease over the four-year period.

The UC San Diego team also observed an increase in the percentage of at-risk students in counseling, from 11.5 percent to 15 percent during the same period, a more than 30 percent increase. This is a good sign because it means people are seeking help.

The HEAR program involves both educational lectures to de-stigmatize mental illness within the broader medical community and voluntary anonymous participation in an interactive online screening survey, developed by American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Those screened as having depression or at-risk of suicide are referred to counseling or other treatment options.

“Our goals are to educate, de-stigmatize, identify, refer and treat medical students with depression and at risk of suicide,” said Nancy Downs, MD, a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and lead author. “The next step is to follow medical students through time to document whether early intervention has lasting-long term benefits.”

More than a dozen medical schools across the nation are currently testing the HEAR program.

The statistics speak to the need: Medical students are 15 to 30 percent more likely to suffer depression than others in their age group and rates of suicide are 200 percent greater among female doctors and 40 percent greater among male doctors than other professionals.

Pictured: Image courtesy of Maryam Soltani, a first-year resident at UC San Diego in family psychiatry.

Reblogged from therosehasthorns  462,795 notes
Reblogged from qxiu  42,826 notes

newerleaf:

flancrossing:

this is a hat you can buy

I’M FUCKING DYING